Hospice

Lewis-Manning Hospice Care To Relocate & Deliver New End of Life Services

Clare Gallie, CEO Lewis-Manning Hospice Care with Dorset High Sheriff, Philip Warr and one of Lewis-Manning Hospice Cares’ new Trustees and former employee, Dr Linda Thompson.

Lewis-Manning Hospice Care announced today that they are relocating to central Poole, following the sale of their building at Crichel Mount which has been purchased by local charity and care home operator, Care South.

Jeremy Allin, Chairman of Lewis-Manning Hospice Care said “Lewis-Manning Hospice Care are sincerely grateful to Care South for granting a license to enable us to stay at Crichel Mount for up to 6 months while adjustments are made to our new home at Longfleet in order to make it fully fit for our purposes and we hope to make the move into Poole early in 2020.”

The new more centralised premises located in Longfleet Road, Poole, will enable the Hospice to provide a convenient location for people at the end of their lives, within easy access of transport networks, closer to Poole Hospital with excellent parking facilities. The move is planned for early 2020, allowing for renovation to their new home in order to make it fully fit for purpose.

This exciting news comes as Lewis-Manning Hospice Care plan to continue delivering their well-established day hospice and clinics in Poole, whilst expanding their services, providing new and vital support into the community, working alongside Community Hospitals, Care Homes and GP Practices. These inspiring plans for future expansion include the opening of new day hospice services, as well as better breathing clinical services one day per week in local towns across the area starting in Wareham and Swanage, then expanding across East Dorset, bringing end of life care closer to home.

Clare Gallie, CEO Lewis-Manning Hospice Care, said: “This is an exciting step for Lewis-Manning Hospice Care and it endorses our commitment to the local people and the community that we serve, support and care for. As we move forward, we are delighted to have been joined by five new Trustees, expanding our Board and bringing a broad range of experience and knowledge. Together we hope to open even more local hospice services

and work within communities further afield to help more people at the end of their lives, closer to their homes.

Clare continues: “The move follows the difficult decision in April 2019 to close our 6 bed inpatient unit (which cost us £1.2 million per year to operate) due to funding sustainability in an area where other local hospices that are largely funded by the NHS are providing similar bedded services. Our unique day hospice and support clinics remain fully open for people needing end of life support and together with our staff and Board of Trustees we are now developing our three year strategy as well as plans to expand the work we do across the East Dorset community, delivering our exceptional trusted hospice care where it is really needed, closer to home and we are delighted to share endorsements from those who support”

Clare continues, “It costs nearly £1.3 million to run our charitable Hospice each year, we receive just 20% of our income from the NHS. I would like to ask the people of east Dorset to help us to deliver these new services by supporting us with a gift of just £5 per month, by asking the companies that they work at to support us, or by holding a fundraising event. Together we can help to improve local end of life care for those that really need it. ”

Eugine Yafele, Chief Executive of Dorset Healthcare, said: “We are delighted to be working with Lewis-Manning Hospice Care, by delivering more end of life services across our community and there will be clear benefits to local people at the end of their lives.”

The move into the community has been welcomed by key partners including Dorset Commissioners, Patrons and volunteers.

Tim Goodson, Chief Officer at Dorset CCG said: “I am pleased that Lewis-Manning Hospice Care is taking its valuable services out into our community to benefit people closer to home.”

Angus Campbell a supporter of the charity and Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant for Dorset said: “As a Patron of Lewis-Manning Hospice Care, I am delighted to support such an inspired plan to develop wider hospice care services and bring them closer to the people of Dorset by reaching out into our wider community. I would hope that this is the start of a new and exciting evolution in such essential services.”  

Philip Warr, The High Sheriff of Dorset said, “Having chosen Lewis-Manning Hospice Care as one of my charities this year I am pleased to support their plans to bring end of life services closer to where people really need them, closer to home. These important services will be of huge benefit to our community.”

Felicity Irwin DL Chairman of Care South, , said “We are delighted to have had the opportunity to assist Lewis-Manning Hospice Care and Care South will ultimately open a dedicated residential care home on the site for frail elderly residents. This is an acquisition which is very pleasing and we will continue the association by it being known as ‘Marjorie House’ – Marjorie Lewis-Manning being the founding benefactor of the Lewis-Manning charity”.

For more information, please contact Jackie@routepr.agency on 01202 89698, 07740 611147 or Clare Gallie, CEO Lewis-Manning Hospice Care on 07494 691372, clare.gallie@lewis-manning.co.uk to contact Care South, Chris Parsons, Marketing Manager Chris.Parsons@care-south.co.uk

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Photo: Clare Gallie, CEO Lewis-Manning Hospice Care with Dorset High Sheriff, Philip Warr and one of Lewis-Manning Hospice Cares’ new Trustees and former employee Dr Linda Thompson taken at 56 Longfleet Road, Poole, September 2019.

Notes For Editors:

National organisation, Hospice UK identified that 1 in 4 people who require end of life care feel they are not getting the support they need (Hospice UK, 2017) to stay at home if they wish to.

Registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC), 100% compliance was reported in our latest unannounced inspection and resulted in a rating of ‘Good’ across all domains.

In 2018, just over 5200 attendances were recorded across the three services run at LMH – a Day Hospice, a Lymphoedema Clinic and a Better Breathing Clinic. Patients through a range of activities have access to specialist nursing care, advice and practical support, an art and wellbeing group as well as future services such as physiotherapy, carer and spiritual support. With our support end of life patients are enabled to stay at home longer, therefore reducing inappropriate hospital admissions.

Our service is open to adults living with a life-limiting illness who reside in Poole, the rural towns and villages of the Isle of Purbeck and from across East Dorset which is also significantly rural. Last year 348 people benefitted from our care, 71% were over the age of 70, two thirds were female and just over half of were living with cancer.

About Lewis-Manning Hospice Care

The hospice service promotes acceptance, hope and peace of mind in a safe and calming environment, helping people live well through their illness and beyond. It aims to ensure that local people are given access to the support they may need to help them cope with their illness and the changes it may bring and give support and respite to carers.

Lewis-Manning Hospice Care has a range of services run by its team of palliative care nurses, which includes day hospice (specialist nursing care, physiotherapy, creative arts and complementary therapy), Lymphoedema clinic and Better Breathing clinic.

Lewis-Manning Hospice Care is also developing new services all the time and this includes education, and support groups for families and carers. For more information visit www.lewis-manning.co.uk.

Registered Charity No. 1120193

Editors may contact Clare Gallie, CEO at Lewis-Manning Hospice Care, on 07494 691372 or email clare.gallie@lewis-manning.co.uk

About Care South

Care South is the leading provider of high quality residential and home care services across the South of England.

Care South is a well-established registered charity (not-for-profit organisation).

Care South offers a full range of care services for people of all ages: from young people whom need some temporary help with everyday life, to older people looking for a new home with full-time care.

The company’s headquarters are based in Poole, Dorset.

More details of the company can be found on its website www.care-south.co.uk or contact Chris Parsons, Marketing Manager Chris.Parsons@care-south.co.uk

Questions & Answers

Who is buying the Lewis-Manning Hospice Care building?

The building at Crichel Mount has been bought by Care South, a Poole based charity who operate care homes and home care services across the south of England.

Care South has worked closely in support of Lewis-Manning Hospice Care and has granted the charity a license to enable the uninterrupted continuation of the day hospice, lymphedema and breathing clinics for a further six months whilst the new premises are being refurbished. Lewis-Manning Hospice Care is relocating its hospice to a more central building, closer to town, closer to Poole Hospital, with parking and significantly improved transport links.

How much money did you receive for the Crichel Mount Lewis-Manning Hospice Care?

We received enough money to repay the loans that were initially taken out to help pay for our building and services. This gave us a smaller amount of money to put towards a new building, closer to town, closer to Poole hospital, with parking and significantly improved transport links. However, we still need to ask the public to help us by raising funds for our charity in order to continue and expand our services into the future, closer to home.

We are grateful to Care South for agreeing to the additional six month license at Lewis Manning Hospice, at no rent, to enable the Trust to secure and fit out the new premises.

What about the donations that people made to Lewis-Manning Hospice Care building originally?

The generous donations made by the public, trusts and grant making bodies will be reinvested in our new building. We have agreed with Care South that we can take with us the equipment that we need to continue to deliver our services into the future, closer to home.

When will the move take place?

We have agreed with Care South that we will be staying at our hospice in Crichel Mount for up to 6 months while we make some adjustments to our new home in order to make it fully fit for our purpose. We hope to make the move early in 2020. We welcome offers of help and support from our local community with the building and decorating works.

How far away from our existing building is the new building?

The new building is 2.5 miles from our existing building and 8 minutes in the car.

When will the new services open?

Our existing day hospice and clinics will continue to run in Poole. We are in discussions with partners in Swanage and Wareham and are starting to raise the money to fund these new services. We hope to announce the opening of our new closer to home services early in 2020.

How will you staff the new services?

We hope that our existing staff will be keen to work with us in the new service areas as well as continuing their work in Poole, we will also be recruiting locally for nursing and healthcare professionals.

How will moving to the new building benefit the local community?

Our new building is more central, it is much closer to Poole hospital, and it is closer to town with significantly improved transport links with both bus and train services, and additional parking. In addition, our new services will provide support to people where it is really needed, closer to home for the needs of the local community.

Why did Lewis-Manning Hospice Care decide to relocate?

The new premises located on Longfleet Road, Poole, will enable the Hospice to provide a more central location for people at the end of their lives, within easy access of transport networks, closer to Poole Hospital with improved parking facilities. This move will allow us to continue to deliver our well established day hospice and clinics in Poole, whilst expanding our services into areas where it is really needed, closer to home.

Does this move mean the future of Lewis-Manning Hospice Care is uncertain?

Together with our staff and Board of Trustees we are now developing our three year strategy as well as plans to expand the work we do across the East Dorset community. We want to help even more local people in East Dorset at the end of their lives and to do this we need to ask for local people to support these new services through charitable donations, holding events, company support which is critical to our expansion.

How will the new services be funded?

As the only independent hospice in East Dorset we rely on the amazing generosity of the local public and we will be working even more closely with local communities to ask for their help in funding these important new services. A gift of just £5 per month would help us enormously to bring quality hospice care to where it is really needed, closer to home.

How do you think Marjorie Lewis-Manning would feel about these plans?

We believe that Mrs Lewis-Manning would want to ensure the future of the Hospice that she so cared about and that she would fully understand the need to change the way in which we deliver these important services for people at the end of their lives in order to meet local need. The idea that in some areas of East Dorset no accessible day hospice service exists and that we are planning to fill that gap, with her legacy, we believe would be of comfort to Mrs Lewis-Manning.

What about the current site where Mrs Lewis-Manning lived, she gave that land to become a hospice?

The new more centralised premises located in Longfleet Road, Poole, will enable the Hospice to provide a more central location for people at the end of their lives, within easy access of transport networks, closer to Poole Hospital with improved parking facilities. From this site we will go out into the community to provide new Closer to Home services.

Care South will provide a residential care home for the frail elderly at the Crichel Mount site. That way the current site will continue to provide care for the elderly and continue to be operated by a charity.

Care South has suggested and is delighted to confirm that the new home will be known as Marjorie House in honour of Lewis-Manning Hospice Care’s founding benefactor.

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